Are You Missing an Opportunity?

By Karen English, CPCU, ARM and Lai-Sahn Hackett, CPDM

 

Introduction to Voluntary Benefits

Gone are the days of “voluntary” being frowned upon in the workplace.  We are past the stage of employer unease with the concept and the resulting worry about “selling” to employees.  Instead, voluntary benefits have become a welcome addition – some would even say critical – yielding increasingly competitive employee benefits packages that couldn’t be offered without them.

we are at a point where employers welcome voluntary benefits, yielding increasingly competitive employee benefits packages that couldn’t have been reached without them.Voluntary Benefits Dental Insurance

Voluntary benefits are insurance products or services made available by employers, but paid for by employees.   They are typically offered at lower rates than employees can find on their own, and provide a degree of choice beyond an employer’s core benefit offering.  There are a number of insurance carriers that underwrite them with products ranging from traditional life, disability, dental and vision to emerging concepts such as critical illness, identity theft protection and student loan repayment.

Employers like voluntary benefits because they make their packages stronger and tailored to the wants and needs of their specific workforce. Employees like them because they are easily accessible, pre-vetted, discounted and more diverse than traditional benefits. Carriers, brokers and consultants like them because they are a needed extension of employer core offerings.

Employer Need

Voluntary Employee BenefitsIn today’s competitive environment, employers are striving to maintain relevant benefit offerings despite increasing costs and the continuing uncertainty of healthcare reform.  The constant need to attract and retain talent and increase productivity is even further challenged by evolving workforce demographics and degree of consumerism being applied to every interaction. Further, a recent survey found that sixty percent of employees are likely to take a job with lower pay but better benefits, emphasizing the importance of a robust benefits program made possible, in part, through voluntary products1.

However, it should not be looked at with a one-size-fits-all approach. Employers can no longer look across their employee populations and make a short list of benefits that will fulfill their collective needs.  With millennials now equaling the baby boomers in number, and generation X’ers on their way to surpassing both, employers need to think about not only age and gender, but also personas within these segments, such as what is warranted by income and lifestyle2.

Market Response

In recognition of these needs, insurance carriers have expanded their capabilities beyond what are typically core employer-paid benefits to what are often referred to as supplemental employee-paid benefits that can either be stand-alone or structured as buy-ups to core plans.  This expansion has opened up possibilities for employers, as they are no longer subject to a subset of specialty carriers and brokers with limited and often self-serving products. They instead can turn to over twenty3 of the most recognized life and health carriers to fulfill the widespread needs of their employees.Voluntary Benefits Trends

These carriers are partnering with employers, brokers and consultants to design voluntary programs that will resonate with employee populations.  Whether it is employee health, wealth, security and/or personal needs that an employer is looking to address, the products that can respond are broad, appealing and growing.  Considering the category of health, for example – accident, critical illness, dental and hospital indemnity are among the most common voluntary benefits offered4.  Within the category of wealth – optional disability, financial counseling and student loan repayment are highly popular. With respect to security, identity theft protection is projected to be the fastest growing voluntary benefit and within the personal sphere, pet insurance is following suit5.

How to Get Started

If you are grappling with how to find that happy medium for your workforce, taking the following steps will give you a start.

1. First and foremost, assess what your employees are interested in. At this point of conducting employee surveys and/or focus groups, you aren’t making any promises, just trying to listen and understand which voluntary products would be more valued than others.Voluntary Benefits Prices

2. Armed with this information, consider what your population can afford. You may find, for example, that six voluntary products are of most interest to your workforce. This doesn’t mean that employees can afford to buy all six.  In fact, we find that no matter how many are offered, employees purchase no more than three voluntary products at any given time6.

3. From here, think about resources to enroll and administer voluntary benefits. You may already have a technology platform you will want to leverage, or existing relationships with a set of carriers and enrollment firms that can help streamline the process.

Employee Benefits Communications4. Lastly and most importantly, contemplate not only how you will communicate their availability, but ultimately why employees should consider them. Employee education is critical to the reception of voluntary benefits, and the value proposition or “need” has to be clear for a benefit to even be considered7. This need should ideally be developed and communicated prior to the enrollment period, not during enrollment when the employee has likely already made up their mind and is not as open to processing new information.

Conclusion

In closing, the world of voluntary benefits looks very different than it did even five years ago. This shift is a result of a variety of factors including the rising costs of healthcare, changing workforce demographics, the increasing customizability of services in general, and the growing challenges presented by recruitment and retention. We are at a moment in time where stakeholders – employers, employees, carriers, brokers/consultants and more – are aligned and where there are great options for all parties.  The opportunities are endless and can be considered as a short-term strategy for now, with a longer-term view established based on the initial roll-out results.

 

Sources:

2016 Aflac WorkForces Report, op.cit
Pew Research Center, Millennials Overtake Baby Boomers as America’s Largest Generation, April 25, 2016
3 Spring Consulting Group Voluntary Pulse Market Update, 2016
4 Spring Consulting Group Voluntary Market Pulse, 2016
5 Willis Towers Watson Voluntary Benefits Survey, 2016
6 Spring Consulting Group Voluntary Employee Pulse, 2015
7 Spring Consulting Group Voluntary Employee Pulse, 2016

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Karen English

Karen English

Karen Trumbull English, CPCU, ARM, ACI, AU is a Partner with Spring Consulting Group, LLC, formerly Watson Wyatt Insurance & Financial Services, Inc. She has twenty years of experience that spans across both health & welfare and property & casualty arenas, and routinely works with her clients on program strategy, product development, process improvement and market research initiatives. She leads the firms’ health and productivity approach and is actively involved in voluntary and other emerging benefits. Prior to joining Spring Consulting Group and Watson Wyatt, Karen led the regional risk & insurance practice for a small consulting firm, held the role of Assistant Risk Manager for one of the nation’s largest banks (U.S. Bank), and was a casualty broker for two of the world’s largest insurance brokers (Marsh and Aon). Karen has her BBA in Risk Management and Human Resources from University of Wisconsin-Madison, and her MBA in Finance from University of Minnesota – Carlson School of Management. She has also earned the designations of CPCU, ARM, ACI, and AU and is a licensed insurance broker.